Continuing Education Bits for PTs & PTAs

Here is how you voted:

Well, that was interesting! Here is how you voted on the 3-question quiz about differential diagnosis:

The question was: What’s the best test for ruling out impingement of the shoulder? You voted:

DidDiag 1

And the correct answer? The 297 people (62% of total) who chose Hawkins-Kennedy Test were correct!

The next question was: What is the best test to determine the presence of clinical osteoarthritis? Votes were close between “Pain in the morning” and “3 or more planes of ROM loss”. Correct answer?

DifDiag 2

3 or more planes of ROM loss! 35% of respondents had it right.

And, finally, we asked: “Which is the most useful test for ruling out the presence of any sacroiliac lesion?” You answered as follows:

DifDiag 3

Who hit it on the nail? Well, the 65 (only 14% of total respondents!) who said “Long dorsal ligament palpation”!

Seems like this is an area where a bit of skill sharpening could be useful! Our Differential Diagnosis course is taught by Dr. Chad Cook, a recognized expert in this field. He has taught over 2,000 physical therapists a year on the topic, and his books have sold over 5,000 copies. His writing and teaching is evidence-based and well received, as demonstrated through his over 70 peer-reviewed publications and his multiple awards in teaching and writing, including the 2009 Dorothy E. Baethke — Eleanor J. Carlin Award recipient for Excellence in Academic Teaching, from the APTA.

Differential Diagnosis is a 7.5-CE-hour course, so not only are you learning important information from the best in the field, but also getting con ed credits for your certification renewal.

Hope you found the above test fun and useful, and we welcome your comments and suggestions. Feel free, as always, to peruse our FREE research library where you can find many great papers on this subject.

Warmly,

Marilyn Pink, PT, Ph.D.

 

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Comments on: "Here is how you voted:" (3)

  1. […] Here is a simple, 3-question quiz on differential diagnosis. To see how others answered, click on the “view results” link on each question. To see the correct answers, click here. […]

  2. Abraham

    In most cases, well designed clustered studies (with large sample sizes) give better results than 1 or 2 tests alone. I’ve published about 4 clustered studies (they are time consuming and expensive) but sadly, we don’t do many of these in PT. I’m not sure which tests you were referring too but I’d be glad to provide references for any that you are interested in. References are provided for all tests in my course with Educata. FYI, in some instances, single test results provide more robust diagnostic values than clusters but comparing study to study, with differences in design nuances (such as quality, spectrum etc) is probably not a great idea. In many cases, we simply are still trying to figure out what is best. Cheers CC

  3. Hello, Please cite the sources for your answers. Clusters of tests are truly a better answer than any single test from my readings. Thanks – Abraham

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